I have been giving considerable thought to the bird’s-eye-view of the series of events we are reading about in Exodus right now. I had some new observations I thought worth sharing with you. If you recall, the last few chapters have had a varied array of behavior by our friends (so like us) – the Children of Israel. The narrative jumps back and forth between two levels of description. The descriptions of actual events that occurred on fateful days in their lives are interspersed with the detailed descriptions of God’s commands for how to construct and operate their new system of worship on a national level. It is unlike the way human authors typically write a narrative. That’s clearly because it is not a human Author.

The Book of Ecclesiastes reads like a medical journal entry listing the modern day afflictions of the American populace. Boredom, insomnia, anxiety, depression, angst, fear, anger and despair are all outlined. It describes the emptiness of even phenomenal success and wealth. It is the testimony of a thinking person who is self-analytical in looking back at their life accomplishments and deciding they were all pretty much futile. It uses a common Bible teaching technique of encouraging us to learn from the mistakes of others.

As I was reading Hosea 2 today, I wondered if this is where Jesus got the idea for the parable of the Prodigal Son. I found, as I compared and contrasted the stories, that they complement and complete one another. Together they are like a musical composition that has various parts that combine synergistically to make exquisite, melodious harmony.

There are a growing number of definitions of the word “highway”. In the distant past it would have meant a public path or road. In modern times we think of a multi-lane pavement filled with fast-moving cars (or sometimes not as fast as we might wish) and congestion. We also have a more theoretical, more modern highway – the Information Highway – which is the communication network of the technological world that uses a variety of devices to quickly relay great quantities of information.