Passion empowers a person to go above and beyond the ordinary. A common phrase bandied about in many circles these days is; “Follow your passion.” I believe this usually means to explore your inner desires and pursue them with gusto. I would submit that this does not ultimately or truly lead to the contentment the phrase implies. Some people might be passionate about money or sports participation, and yet if something thwarts their direction they feel devastated – even purposeless. The Bible outlines a type of passion that is unrelenting and always meaningful, and rewarding – no matter our circumstances.

“All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts.” This quote from Shakespeare came to mind today as I was reflecting on the sad story of Matthew 27. Enter Jesus. Enter Judas, Exit Judas. Exit Jesus. But these actors had very different impacts on the world’s stage, didn’t they? And their respective deaths had dramatically different outcomes (pun intended).

Have you ever had to draw a boundary with someone you love that was excruciatingly difficult? The kind where you feel you have been cornered at last – and you have no other option but to cut them off somehow? The kind where their choices and/or behavior have tied your hands so that you are no longer able to reach to them, help them or have relationship any more? It’s a difficult place to find oneself. I think we sometimes live in denial that it is a real place because it is so painful to have to arrive there. But the Bible is full of stories of this kind of extreme breaking of relationship. Isaiah chapter one describes the raw emotion of just such a scenario.

I find it very exciting in our daily Bible readings to have entered the wonderful world of the mind of “the Disciple whom Jesus loved” – John, Son of Zebedee. This is such a beautiful account of the Gospel message! A dear friend once pointed out to me that John possibly described himself in this book in this way, not in arrogance, but rather in the humblest of connotations. He meant it to express an idea something like this, “Jesus – the exalted Son of God Himself – loved me, even me. Isn’t that an astonishing and wonderful-beyond-belief thing?!!” I like to approach it like this because I think John was more in-tune with Jesus than most anyone else at the time. He saw his Lord and Savior as both his best friend and his King of Kings. He was so very thankful for Jesus’ love.

The faith of Joshua and Caleb is rather startling when you consider it carefully. Here are two men who had spirits within them that were superior to their peers on every level. These peers, however, were the “leaders’ of their nation. They were well-respected members of the elders of Israel – each a mighty man representing his own tribe. Unfortunately, when a true life-test of faith came along, these men melted into puddles of fear and unbelief. It is worth asking ourselves if we have an exceptional world-view of faith like Joshua and Caleb, or whether we fall into the doubter category.

Last night I was happily surprised to hear lots of croaking frogs down by the creek. I also have been delighted, once again, at the number of singing and squawking birds that are flittering through the trees in our yard. I guess it is true that Spring has begun! The frogs brought to mind a lovely Haiku poem that I have had running through my head ever since.

Do you remember the scene in the original “Grinch Who Stole Christmas” when the Grinch’s heart grew, after he observed the sweet spirit of the Whos, even after he tried to steal their Christmas? Boris Karloff’s voice booming… “In Whoville they say, the Grinch’s heart grew 3 sizes that day!” will forever be etched in my memory. That’s my favorite part!! When I was a child (back in the days when you could only watch it once a year) it was THIS scene that always caused MY heart to swell too.

It is an excellent Bible study technique to take special note of the first occurrence of a given word in Scripture. Often many clues to the hidden wisdom of certain concepts can be ferreted out by exploring their first use very carefully. I was reminded of this as I read Luke Chapter One today. Let’s take “Jesus 101” Class together, shall we? You know the textbook – and the tuition is free!

I have been giving considerable thought to the bird’s-eye-view of the series of events we are reading about in Exodus right now. I had some new observations I thought worth sharing with you. If you recall, the last few chapters have had a varied array of behavior by our friends (so like us) – the Children of Israel. The narrative jumps back and forth between two levels of description. The descriptions of actual events that occurred on fateful days in their lives are interspersed with the detailed descriptions of God’s commands for how to construct and operate their new system of worship on a national level. It is unlike the way human authors typically write a narrative. That’s clearly because it is not a human Author.

Have you ever given much thought to manna? It was an astonishing substance!! It tasted delicious. It appeared and disappeared miraculously. It came in double portions on the sixth day (or at least there was enough for them to gather double portions.) It was convenient. It was versatile and was made into sweet coriander-like cakes (v.31 & Numbers 11:8) It had the nutrition necessary (combined with quail) to keep people healthy in a desert/nomadic lifestyle. It was provided directly, daily by God’s own hand. It was sent for 40 years and stopped on the very day they first ate the produce of the promised land (Joshua 5:12) And wondrously, on certain days, no worms were in the manna!